DIY Archway Tutorial

Hey y’all! I am so excited to dive into the steps for this DIY Arch. What makes this archway stand out is that it has a seamless transition into the wall without a traditional doorway present.

No Arch Kit Needed!

 

After building the two archways for the One Room Challenge, I was taken by the beauty and character that the arches added to the space in the sunroom. So it was time to bring one indoors. This idea in this entry space came last minute, but once I captured the vision in my mind, I had to go after it!

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After.jpg

Since I didn’t use drywall for the outside arches, it presented some learning curves in this process. But overall it went smoothly and was an affordable way to add major charm to our builder-grade 80s home.

Overall the project cost me around $30 because I had leftover supplies. As you can see in the below list of supplies if you have the tools on hand, the cost is affordable. I also tried to install it in a way that it could be pretty easily removed without damaging everything in case it needed to be changed in the future.

Supplies/Tools:

 

Brad nailer

Miter saw

Circular saw

Eye, nose, mouth protection

Ear Protection

Drywall knife

Taping knife

Mud pan

Stomp texture (if applicable)

Exacto Knife

Materials:

 

⅛ Hardboard (Estimate $10)

¼ Drywall (Estimate $11)

Framing wood (Estimate $5)

3 in Connector Screws

Toggle Bolt (If you have an arch side with no stud)

Joint compound

Joint Tape

My Youtube video gives a full overview and

step-by-step process of the build

 

I will also walk you through it here, and feel free to drop any questions below!

Step 1: Test the Shape

My first step was to make a cardboard cut-out. This helps you to visualize the shape and make sure the arch is functional in the existing space. On all three arches, when I made the shape, I pulled the string back from the center of my homemade compass to ensure that my curve is where I want it to be without too much depth on the sides. The ceiling of this hallway is 8 ft high, so having the arch not come too low on the sides was important.


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Arch Drawing Tip

Make sure your DIY Compass (String, Rope, Tape) is center. Then decide how far you need to pull it back, depending on how low you want your arch sides to be. Once I knew the shape was just what I was looking for, I cut the arch shape out of the hardboard.

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Step 2: Turn the Shape into Reality


I was so here for the shape that I had cut out on the cardboard. I cut out all four pieces at the same time. It was a risk but it worked so well! Using hardboard worked out so well for the arch shape. It’s way more durable than the plywood I used for the sunroom edges. It was nice not having to be so careful with it while building the arch.

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Jigsaw Cuts:

All 4 Pieces Together

Testing the jigsaw on scrap pieces helped me to adjust the jigsaw to the right momentum for cutting all four pieces at once.

I cut out framing blocks for the arch with my miter saw. I cut out two different sizes, bigger blocks for attaching into the stud, and thinner blocks for attaching the two sides of the arch together. The thinner blocks were a primer finger joint wood I had on hand that was the exact width of the arch so I didn’t need to be precise with the cuts with the width already what I needed it to be.

Step 3: Secure the Shape Together


I used my Brad nailer to attach the hardboard together with the small blocks.

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I then connected the bigger blocks into the studs and wall. I used connector screws to secure the bigger blocks in the studs. I used a toggle bolt to connect the block in the side with no stud.

I used the nail gun to secure the whole arch into the stud blocks. I made some cuts from the leftover hardboard to shim my arch in place at the top and sides.

Securing Blocks in Studs

Securing Blocks in Studs


Toggle Bolt for Side with No Stud

Toggle Bolt for Side with No Stud


Securing Arch Shape in Stud Blocks

Securing Arch Shape in Stud Blocks


Shimming the Middle of the Arch with Hardboard

Shimming the Middle of the Arch with Hardboard


Securing Blocks in Studs
Toggle Bolt for Side with No Stud
Securing Arch Shape in Stud Blocks
Shimming the Middle of the Arch with Hardboard

Step 4: Drywall that Archway

Next up was making my drywall cuts. My Youtube video captures the real-life feels of this process because the trial and error was legit! I tried to score my drywall for the arch area but the result was too bumpy for my liking. So on my second try, I wet it underwater and it became pliable and I was able to form it in the arch shape.

With cutting the arch sides, on the first side I attempted to nail gun it in place then cut the drywall. It felt like a disaster and was so choppy. On the second side, I held the drywall up and drew the outline, then scored the outline on the ground.

Would not recommend cutting it while on!

Would not recommend cutting it while on!

Trail & error

Outlined while holding it up, then scored it on the ground

Outlined while holding it up, then scored it on the ground


Wet the arch underside piece and it made it pliable and easy to work with

Wet the arch underside piece and it made it pliable and easy to work with


The vision is coming to life!

The vision is coming to life!

Would not recommend cutting it while on!
Outlined while holding it up, then scored it on the ground
Wet the arch underside piece and it made it pliable and easy to work with
The vision is coming to life!

Step 5: Seamless Finish!


For the finishing process with mud, I decided to forego using corner bead, and just use tape. This worked out amazingly. Since our arch transitions into the wall, I struggled to find any tutorials for the side transitions. So I decided to use a piece of tape to transition into the wall. It worked out beautifully and was a seamless transition.

Cutting the tape to fit the curve of the arch.

Cutting the tape to fit the curve of the arch.


Applying the tape on the sides of the archway.

Applying the tape on the sides of the archway.


applying the tape to make a seamless transition above the arch.

applying the tape to make a seamless transition above the arch.


Wet sanding, to avoid to much dust at the final sanding.

Wet sanding, to avoid to much dust at the final sanding.

I did this process a couple of hours after I applied a thin layer of mud.

Alll the thin coats, but it made for a great finish!

All the thin coats, but it made for a great finish!


Use a small piece of tape the width of the arch to make a seamless transition into the wall.

Use a small piece of tape the width of the arch to make a seamless transition into the wall.

Struggled to find how-to’s for this part but it worked out well.

Added light coats of mud over it.

Added light coats of mud over it.


The key to great stomp texture that matched our walls was to make sure the tool was saturated with water.

The key to great stomp texture that matched our walls was to make sure the tool was saturated with water.


The other key was to make sure the joint compound was watered down enough.

The other key was to make sure the joint compound was watered down enough.


Cutting the tape to fit the curve of the arch.
Applying the tape on the sides of the archway.
applying the tape to make a seamless transition above the arch.
Wet sanding, to avoid to much dust at the final sanding.
Alll the thin coats, but it made for a great finish!
Use a small piece of tape the width of the arch to make a seamless transition into the wall.
Added light coats of mud over it.
The key to great stomp texture that matched our walls was to make sure the tool was saturated with water.
The other key was to make sure the joint compound was watered down enough.

Stomp Texture Tips

We have stomp texture in our home. I have failed at matching the stomp texture over and over. This time I watched a lot of Youtube videos, and realized a couple of strategies to have better blending with the existing stomp texture.

  • Make sure to wet the stomp tool thoroughly.

  • Make sure the mud is thinned out enough.

  • Practice the blending until it looks similar to your own stomp texture

After the texture was complete, I painted and primed the area! I could not believe how seamless the wall and arch transition appeared.

Enjoy the Fruit of Your Labor!


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I recently had a photographer in our home, and she thought the arch was pre-existing which was a beautiful compliment to the DIY!

I added a fun accent of gifted Hygge & West wallpaper on the small hallway ceiling, and I cannot get over the beauty and impact this hallway has made. We finished the entry with a beautiful entry light fixture (Sasha) and entry table lamp (Vicky) in collab with Mitzi.

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Let me know in the comments if you have any questions, and I hope this tutorial was helpful and empowering for you.


Don’t forget to Dwell Aware out there!

Disclaimer: this post may contain affiliate links, meaning I get a commission if you decide to make a purchase through my links, at no cost to you.

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